You’re taking advanced math, so what?

So You’re Taking Advanced Math. So What?

When you get to around seventh grade there are these so called “brilliant” students who take math at around a ninth-grade or tenth-grade level. They make a living by memorizing π and flaunting their extreme math skills to us “average” students, and believe me, it’s VERY VERY ANNOYING!!! Especially because they’re bragging about a skill that they will most certainly not need later in life. So in truth, they want to have bragging rights, but as us “average” students know, they don’t. In a few years, their calculus prowess will not matter, and no one will care about it.

 The only reason these “brilliant” students care about their advanced math courses so much is because they are stupidly farsighted and under the false impression that being able to do calculus in their sleep will get them a better future. But they have clearly been brainwashed by our crumbling educational system. As G. V. Ramanathan said in the Washington Post: “Unlike literature, history, politics and music, math has little relevance to everyday life. That courses such as ‘Quantitative Reasoning’ improve critical thinking is an unsubstantiated myth. All the mathematics one needs in real life can be learned in early years without much fuss. Most adults have no contact with math at work, nor do they curl up with an algebra book for relaxation.” He is definitely correct. And so my message to these “brilliant” students is as follows: Okay, sure you can do some really advanced math. That’s cool. But if you’re not going to need it later in life, what’s the point? Perhaps it’s time to rework our school system so that students like you can actually learn some relevant skills. And if you want to take high school math courses, fine. Do it for fun on the weekends. (With no bragging involved)

Disclaimer: This post was written (except for a few minor edits) by a friend and I take no credit for this 10/10 writing

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